CULT OF KNOT CRAFT

https://www.etsy.com/shop/MoonSerpentJewelry

1 note

I’ve made only one of this piece and it is sold via @belowshop I wonder who wears it and where it is 🌍 FYI you can find nine other works of mine at belowshop.com

I’ve made only one of this piece and it is sold via @belowshop I wonder who wears it and where it is 🌍 FYI you can find nine other works of mine at belowshop.com

59 notes

blackpaint20:

The fly as a symbol of the pagan god Beelzebub
The contrast between the positive aspect of the ants and the demonic of the flies is represented in this Mystical Crucifixion by the Spanish artist Joan Rosat (1445). In  the highlight shown, ants appear to the left of the painting as hard-working insects which symbolise the good Christians who collect and store up the Word of God, in contrast to the ant posed on Adam’s skull, an image of the sin of our first father which was redeemed by the blood of the crucified
The spider, being an industrious insect which patiently weaves its web, could be compared to the bee and the ant, but on occasions in the Christian dialect symbolises the astuteness of the devil because of the artful form in which it traps its victims into the net. Both St. Isodore of Seville in his Etimologias and another, later enyclopedist, Pierre de Beauvais (13th c.), identify the spider with the devil. Later, in the second half  of  the 14thc., The Book of Cats, a  Spanish translation of the fables of  Odo de Cheriton (13th c.) takes the example of the wasp and the spider; where the first is subtly trapped in the spider’s web, symbolising a soul captured in the devil’s net.
Quoted from source 

blackpaint20:

The fly as a symbol of the pagan god Beelzebub

The contrast between the positive aspect of the ants and the demonic of the flies is represented in this Mystical Crucifixion by the Spanish artist Joan Rosat (1445). In  the highlight shown, ants appear to the left of the painting as hard-working insects which symbolise the good Christians who collect and store up the Word of God, in contrast to the ant posed on Adam’s skull, an image of the sin of our first father which was redeemed by the blood of the crucified

The spider, being an industrious insect which patiently weaves its web, could be compared to the bee and the ant, but on occasions in the Christian dialect symbolises the astuteness of the devil because of the artful form in which it traps its victims into the net. Both St. Isodore of Seville in his Etimologias and another, later enyclopedist, Pierre de Beauvais (13th c.), identify the spider with the devil. Later, in the second half  of  the 14thc., The Book of Cats, a  Spanish translation of the fables of  Odo de Cheriton (13th c.) takes the example of the wasp and the spider; where the first is subtly trapped in the spider’s web, symbolising a soul captured in the devil’s net.

Quoted from source